ratcreature: RatCreature watches tv. (tv)
After seeing the ads hyping this everywhere, now that it's available on free tv here, I decided to give Babylon Berlin a try. I watched the first four episodes so far, and have to say that I like it less than I expected.

Historical crime fiction is a genre I normally enjoy, but I also want to like the protagonist(s), and the first episodes didn't make me connect to any of the major characters.

I'll probably finish watching to see the case resolve, though, because it is not bad, and quite pretty to watch.
ratcreature: RatCreature as demon victim, Supernatural-style, i.e. eviscerated, pinned to the ceiling and burning alive. (supernatural)
So, I checked out Damien, because of Bradley James and [personal profile] goss mentioning enjoying it, even though I'm not much into horror, especially not with religious apocalypses.

some thoughts with spoilers for 1x01-1x04 )
ratcreature: RatCreature watches tv. (tv)
As often this season I had some trouble following the somewhat convoluted crime plot, but I like the rest of the episode: spoilers for Numb3rs 5x05 )
ratcreature: RatCreature as Teyla (teyla)
spoilers for SGA 4x20 )

Totally unrelated to SGA I learned a new piece of trivia today: I've always been vaguely puzzled by the color name "ivory black" because it seemed contradictory (ivory not being black and all). Then today I happened to look at the label on the back of a tube of acrylic ivory black, one that went into all kinds of technical detail that I have no idea what it means (it has some kind of numbers for hue, value, chroma and codes for the pigments and symbols for opaqueness and lightfastness and so on) but also had a list of ingredients and apparently that black is made from charred animal bones. Hence the name "ivory black".

And I get that historically, though I'd have thought that by now the color would be synthetic. I mean, it's not they are still grinding up lapis lazuli for ultramarine (well, I guess there might be people who are into restoration and such and make their colors themselves from scratch with pigments or specialty producers who still do that, but usually it's synthetic these days). So it's kind of gross that they still use animal bones, but that what the tube says in its ingredient list under the "vehicle: acrylic polymer emulsion" there's "pigment: amorphous carbon produced by charring animal bones". So I'm using the same pigment as my prehistoric ancestors, I guess, only in a prepared polymer solution rather than charring some hunted mammoth's bone myself. Still in my mind "gross" kind of wins out over "artistic connection across millennia of history".

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